Test day should be a fair and smooth experience for every student. While proctors strive to administer the Digital SAT properly, they might not always get everything right. Knowing your rights as a test-taker is crucial. If you believe your rights are being overlooked or a problem arises, address it politely with your proctor. If the issue persists or if the proctor cannot resolve it, do not hesitate to ask to speak with the test coordinator. The test coordinator has additional training and is the final authority on test day.

 

Table of Contents

 

1. Right to a Secure and Disruption-Free Testing Environment (jump to section)
2. Right to an Approved Calculator (jump to section)
3. Right to a Device Swap if Necessary (jump to section)
4. Right to Specific Items on and Beneath Their Desk (jump to section)
5. Right to Minimum Writing Area and Seating Arrangements (jump to section)
6. Right to Additional Sheets of Scratch Paper Upon Request (jump to section)
7. Right to Technical Support and Troubleshooting (jump to section)
8. Right to Clear Instructions for Digital Testing Tools (jump to section)
9. Right to Breaks as Scheduled and Emergency Needs (jump to section)
10. Right to Report Testing Irregularities (jump to section)
References (jump to section)

At the NTPA, we want you to not only master the content of the test but also familiarize yourself with how the test is administered. If you have that familiarity, you begin to understand the agency you’re entitled to on test day. You, as a test taker, have rights. And it’s up to you to know what they are. As an SAT Test-Taker, these are your rights:

 

1. Right to a Secure and Disruption-Free Testing Environment:

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Students have the right to a testing environment that is secure and free from major disturbances. Minor distractions are unavoidable, but in the event of a major disruption, see that your proctor notify the test coordinator immediately.[1]

 

2. Right to an Approved Calculator

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Students have the right to use an approved calculator on certain sections of the SAT. This includes graphing calculators, scientific calculators, and four-function calculators as specified in the SAT Suite of Assessments Proctor Manual. Test-takers should verify that their calculators are on the list of approved devices to avoid any issues on test day.[2]

3. Right to a Device Swap if Necessary

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Students have the right to swap their testing devices in case of technical failures or malfunctions, ensuring they can continue their test with minimal disruption. This includes moving to a backup device that has been prepared for such scenarios.[3]

4. Right to Specific Items on and Beneath Their Desk

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Test-takers are entitled to have certain items on their desk, such as approved calculators, scratch paper provided by the proctor, pens or pencils, and their testing devices. Beneath their desk, they can store essential personal items, including snacks and water (for access during breaks), medication, and power banks for device charging.[4]

5. Right to Minimum Writing Area and Seating Arrangements

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Students have the right to a minimum writing area, ensuring sufficient space to work comfortably. This includes a large, smooth writing surface and a seating arrangement that facilitates focus and comfort, such as chairs with backs and adequate separation from other test-takers to prevent distractions. Tablet-arm chairs must have a minimum writing surface of 12×15 inches.[5]

6. Right to Additional Sheets of Scratch Paper Upon Request

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Students can request additional sheets of scratch paper during the examination if needed. Proctors are instructed to initially provide one sheet of scratch paper and must supply extra sheets upon request. There have been reports that internal guidance stipulates that students are only allowed one additional sheet, so students are advised to be efficient in their use of scratch paper.[6]

7. Right to Technical Support and Troubleshooting

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The Digital SAT is digital. The word digital implies technology. Technology can and will eventually fail. Students have the right to immediate technical support for any issues encountered while they take the Digital SAT. This support includes troubleshooting technical problems with the testing platform or hardware to ensure they can proceed with their test smoothly.[7]

8. Right to Clear Instructions for Digital Testing Tools

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Test-takers have the right to receive clear, understandable instructions on how to use digital testing tools and platforms, including the Bluebook application. This ensures all students, regardless of their familiarity with digital tools, can navigate the testing process effectively.[8]

9. Right to Breaks as Scheduled and Emergency Needs

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Students have the right to scheduled breaks, as the test administration guidelines outline. Additionally, in cases of emergency or urgent need, students can request an unscheduled break, understanding it may affect their testing time.[9]

10. Right to Report Testing Irregularities

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Students should report any breaches of testing protocol, disruptions, or other procedural errors encountered during the examination. Proctors must promptly address and document any such incidents to maintain the integrity and fairness of the test environment. This includes irregularities that do not directly involve technical issues, ensuring all aspects of the test conduct are strictly adhered to.[10]

Conclusion

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Remember, in the realm of Digital SAT testing, you have the power to uphold these rights, ensuring not just liberty but also fairness for all test-takers. To further study what you’re entitled to on the Digital SAT, look at the College Board’s Test Proctor Manual.

Good luck to you all!

Signed, Your Friends at the National Test Prep Association

About the Author

 

Image of Ari Freuman, a digital SAT tutor and NTPA memberAri Freuman began his tutoring career in 2013, primarily serving Northern New Jersey and New York students. In 2020, he founded Ivy Tutor to address the need for proficient SAT and ACT tutors, building a team of dynamic and inspiring educators. Ari holds a master’s degree in psychology from SUNY New Paltz and a second Master’s in Statistics, leveraging his academic background to help students maximize their test scores. Based in Hoboken, New Jersey, Ari teaches students worldwide through virtual sessions. Additionally, Ari serves on the NTPA blog committee, contributing his expertise to the organization’s outreach efforts.

References

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[1]College Board. “Spring 2024 SAT Suite of Assessments Proctor Manual.” SAT Suite of Assessments, College Board, 2024, https://satsuite.collegeboard.org/media/pdf/sats-proctor-manual.pdf. Accessed 8 June 2024. p. 24.

[2] Ibid. p. 35.

[3] Ibid. p. 26.

[4] Ibid. p. 20.

[5] Ibid. p. 16.

[6] Ibid. p. 16.

[7] Ibid. p. 14.

[8] Ibid. p. 12.

[9] Ibid. p. 15.

[10] Ibid. p. 28.

Last Updated on June 9, 2024 by Marc Gray